Saturday, January 30, 2010

National Women's History Museum


The National Women's History Museum now has a blog.

Awesome New PDF Tool!

Thank you Judy for posting about this!
You can PDF any webpage you want!  It's so easy - just put your URL in the box and up pops a download box for the PDF.  Even better, you can get a bookmarklet, which makes it even easier.  The ways this can help with saving webpages you like and backing up your data are numerous.

National Women's History Museum


The National Women's History Museum now has a blog.

Surname Saturday: Eichhorn/Eichorn

Each Saturday this year I am posting one of my surnames, going in alphabetical order.  This weeks surname is Eichhorn/Eichorn.  The names in red are my direct line ancestors.


1-Nicholas EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "Germany " \f B
<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->b: calculated 16 January 1799, , , , Germany
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "Canada:Ontario:Niagara:Welland " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->d: 28 July 1878, Welland, Niagara, Ontario, Canada
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "SCHNEIDER:Dorothea " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->+Dorothea SCHNEIDER
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "Germany " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->b: , , , Germany
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Charles Herman (b. 1848) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . 2-Charles Herman EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "Germany " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->        b: 25 December 1848, , , , Germany
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->        d: 25 February 1907, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "WEISS:Katherine (b. 1849) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . +Katherine WEISS
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "Germany " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->        b: April 1849, , , , Germany
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "Canada:Ontario:Welland:Chippewa " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->        m: 3 September 1871, Chippewa, Welland, Ontario, Canada
        d: 1936
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:William Fred (b. 1874) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . 3-William Fred EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "Canada:Ontario:Welland:Chippewa " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                b: 22 June 1874, Chippewa, Welland, Ontario, Canada
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                d: 9 March 1931, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "TROSS:Augusta M. (b. 1877) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . +Augusta M. TROSS
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "Germany " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                b: 6 September 1877, , , , Germany
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                m: 14 June 1899, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                d: 1 January 1939, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Kathryn V. (b. 1901) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . . . . . 4-Kathryn V. EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                        b: about 1901, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
                        d: before 16 June 1966
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Clara Evelyn (b. 1902) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . . . . . 4-Clara Evelyn EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                        b: 3 February 1902, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Marie A. (b. 1905) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . . . . . 4-Marie A. EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                        b: about 1905, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Edna L. (b. 1907) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . . . . . 4-Edna L. EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                        b: about 1907, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
                        d: 2 November 1985
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Lillian L. (b. 1908) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . . . . . 4-Lillian L. EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                        b: 22 December 1908, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                        d: 19 December 1938, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:William Tross (b. 1914) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . . . . . 4-William Tross EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                        b: 10 April 1914, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Frederick William (b. 1875) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . 3-Frederick William EICHHORN
                b: 14 July 1875
<!--[if supportFields]>xe ":Mary C. " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . +Mary C.
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Edward M. " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . . . . . 4-Edward M. EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Dorothy " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . . . . . 4-Dorothy EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:George (b. 1878) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . 3-George EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                b: about 1878, , , New York, USA
                d: 1928
<!--[if supportFields]>xe ":Lauretta Flynn " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . +Lauretta Flynn
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                m: 21 November 1900, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN: (b. 1884) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . 3-EICHHORN
                b: before 1884
                d: before 1884
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN: (b. 1884) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . 3-EICHHORN
                b: before 1884
                d: before 1884
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN: (b. 1884) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . 3-EICHHORN
                b: before 1884
                d: before 1884
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Clara C. (b. 1884) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . 3-Clara C. EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                b: 9 August 1884, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
                d: 1967
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EHRIG:Ernest (b. 1884) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . +Ernest EHRIG
                b: 1884
                m:
                d: 1951
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "EICHHORN:Marie (b. 1891) " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . 3-Marie EICHHORN
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "USA:New York:Erie:Buffalo " \f B<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->                b: 21 December 1891, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
<!--[if supportFields]>xe "GRAFF:William " \f A<![endif]--><!--[if supportFields]><![endif]-->. . . . . . . . +William GRAFF
                m:

Friday, January 29, 2010

IFLA Adopt a Student!

I am officially "adopted" as a student member of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions.  IFLA, according to their website, "is the leading international body representing the interests of library and information services and their users. It is the global voice of the library and information profession."  Their new Adopt a Student! program allows professionals in the field to sponsor a one year membership of a student and act as a mentor.  The student just needs one letter of recommendation and to fill out a (very simple) form.  I am the newest student adopted and am very excited and grateful for this opportunity.

Thursday, January 28, 2010

Data Privacy Day

Today is Data Privacy Day (thank you Angel for posting it).  This day was developed so that people remember to protect their private information, especially on social networking cites.  It is important to remember to privacy settings where ever available.  It is also important to remember that even "private" social networking cites are not actually private and that what goes online never disappears.

Data Privacy Day

Today is Data Privacy Day.  This was created so people would remember to think about their privacy for online sites, particularly in relation to social networking sites.  What does this mean for genealogists?  It is important to remember that what we put online can be seen by all.  If you have a genealogy blog, do not post information about living people unless you have their permission.  Remember also that what you put online will always be there, through Internet Archives' Way Back Machine, for example.  It is always better to be safe than sorry.

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Happy Blogoversary to Me...

It is hard to believe I have been blogging now for a full year.  During this time I have met many great bloggers and cousins through this blog!

Monday, January 25, 2010

Part 5 of The Genealogy Reference Desk Institute

To get to the beginning of this series, go here:-)


Laura Prescott, APG President, spoke on Timelines: Placing Your Heritage in Historical Perspective.  I had not realized the importance in using timelines for your research and plan on using them in the future much more often.


By using timelines, you can see important events that happened in your ancestors lives, which may have influenced their decisions and movements.  You can also use them to migration and settlement patterns, look at military and career paths and track your ancestors through the census, among other things.


Many genealogy programs have timeline options, but there are multiple other places to create them.  The most interesting one is Google Maps.  I have often used this for directions, but was unaware of their My Maps feature.  By adding addresses, you can create a timeline of your ancestors movements, homes or cemetery cites.  You can even add photos, videos or text and then embed the map into a blog post or email it to others.


After Laura, Drew Smith, librarian, author and half of the Genealogy Guys was the last speaker of the day.  His presentation, Using Web 2.0 Tools with a 101 Knowledge Base, was an explanation of using Web 2.0 tools in the library.  I have been reading his book, Social Networking for Genealogists and recommend checking that out for a more thorough explanation of his program than I can give.


It was amazing to hear a presentation by someone who's podcast I listen to on a regular basis.  Using Web 2.0 tools to educate patrons, as well as to provide access to resources and services, is something I have become very interested in for school and future employment situations.  This workshop was a basic overview of these topics for librarians who have been out of school for awhile and need to learn the basics of Web 2.0.


This was a wonderful workshop and I am looking forward to continuing my education in this matter.  Workshops are held four times a year, before the two ALA conferences, before the NGS conference and before the FGS conference.  If you ever have the option to attend, I recommend it highly.

The 11th Hour

When I was approximately ten years old, I created my first environmental awareness club.  I recruited my sister and two of my cousins and convinced my grandmother to sponsor a trip to the Discovery Store, where she bought us two books full of activities.  Ever since that time, I have been very environmentally conscious, going so far as to save all of my cans, bottles and papers at school to bring home when I went, as my college town did not recycle.  As such, I am very excited by the Sustainable Libraries class I am currently taking and look forward to learning about green building, LEED certification and creating sustainable processes and activities within a library.

Our goal this semester is to come up with our own definition of sustainability.  To help us with that, our first assignment was to watch the documentary The 11th Hour.  I highly recommend viewing this movie, particularly the last half hour, which gives both macro and micro things you can do to help.  They also have a Facebook group and webpage if you wish to get further involved.


Week in Review: 18 Jan 2010 – 24 Jan 2010

Research:

  • Read A History of Knockholt in the County of Kent by David Waldron Smithers
    • It has my Knockholt surnames of Bond, Whitehead and Wells(which may or may not be one of my surnames...)
Education:

Blog:
  • My The Genealogy Reference Desk Institute series was listed as one of Genea-Musings Best of Genea-Blogs!!!  This is the first time I have made this list and I may now have to stop blogging, as I have nowhere to go but down...  Randy is one of my genea-blog hero's and to get on this list is a tremendous honor.
  • Caught up on the past 2 weeks of the 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy
Volunteer:
  • Continued transcribing East Aurora in 1865 NY Census for WNYGS

Library Day in the Life

Round 4 of Library Day in the Life is today.  Begun by Bobbi Newman 2008, it allows anyone working in a library to post, either to their blog or on twitter, about what they do all day.  For library school students such as myself or people who are thinking about going to library school, this allows us to see what different types of librarians there are and what they do.

Syracuse University MSLIS students are lucky in that our first required course has two or three alumni speakers each week, discussing what they with their library degree.  It shows us the multitude of options available and gives us recommendations for internships and courses to take.  Reading items like Library Day in the Life and the book A Day in the Life: Career Options in Library and Information Science by Richard Murray and Priscilla K. Shontz also give this type of assistance.  I look forward to participating in a future round once I work in a library.

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy - Week #4

Amy Coffin at the We Tree blog is challenging bloggers to become better genealogists, with a new prompt each week through her 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy:


Week 4: Learn about your local public library’s inter-library loan (ILL) policy. Pick a genealogy-related book that you want to read that is not in your library’s collection. Ask the librarian how to request the book from another library. Find the different library systems from which you can request books through your own library, as this can dramatically increase the number of genealogy books to which you have access. If you have a genealogy blog, write about your experience with requesting items through your library’s ILL service.



I adore inter-library loan.  As a college student, I tend to use the universities system, because I can do it from my couch, while for the public library I have to go in to request an item.  I recently received my first ILL for a genealogy book.  While looking for films on Knockholt, Kent, England from the FHL, I noticed a book that seemed useful: A History of Knockholt in the County of Kent by David Waldron Smithers.  This was published in England in 1991 and is currently out of print.  Only 3 libraries in the USA own it, according to WorldCat: Princeton, Harvard and the Library of Congress.  I ILL requested it through SU and a couple weeks later arrived the apparently never before used (it is pristine!) book from Princeton University.


This book is FANTASTIC!  It was written by a lifelong resident of Knockholt and it mentions surnames such as Bond, Whitehead and Wells.  Are they my Bonds, Whiteheads and Wells'?  It was a small town, so I am sure there is some relation (hopefully I will know for sure when my films come in...)  It also gives the towns history, beginning in the stone age, has photographs, gives information about the parish church records and has more information that gives a genealogist a background on the town their ancestors came from.


If you are new to ILL, be sure to check out WorldCat.  According to their website, "WorldCat is the world's largest network of library content and services. WorldCat libraries are dedicated to providing access to their resources on the Web, where most people start their search for information."  Although not every library in the world is a member, most large libraries, particularly in the US, are and it will give you an idea of what books are out there and where they are located.
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Saturday, January 23, 2010

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: Life Outside Genealogy

From Randy at Genea-MusingsYour mission, should you decide to accept it, is to:

* Tell us about your "other" hobbies or interests outside of genealogy and family history research, writing, speaking, etc.

When not doing genealogy, my hobbies and interests include:

  • Hanging out with my fiancé Aaron, my family and friends - we get tea, play board games, watch movies and chat.
  • Traveling - I love cities, history and subways the most.  I cannot ever imagine traveling to lay on a beach, when there are so many old buildings, churches, museums and world heritage sites to see.  My favorite places I have been include South Africa, Prague, Savannah, and Ottawa.
  • Reading - Mostly nonfiction and magazines.  Recently I have been reading the Thursday Next series by Jasper Fforde, which I highly recommend.  I also hang out in bookstores and libraries as much as possible.
  • Musicals - I used to be in them constantly, but it is too difficult with work and school, so now I just listen to the CD's and go watch them whenever I get the chance.
  • School - I am not sure this can be counted as a hobby, although I love learning new things and attending conferences and classes.  Most of my time has been tied up in this, but I have found a way to combine it with most of my other hobbies...
As you can see, I do have a life outside of genealogy, although most of my interests are still tied to the overall theme of family, history, and research:-)

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy - Week #3

Amy Coffin at the We Tree blog is challenging bloggers to become better genealogists, with a new prompt each week through her 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy:
Assess yourself! You’re great at researching everyone else’s history, but how much of your own have you recorded? Do an assessment of your personal records and timeline events to ensure your own life is as well-documented as that of your ancestors. If you have a genealogy blog, write about the status of your own research and steps you may take to fill gaps and document your own life.


This is an aspect of my research that I have pretty much skipped over entirely.  I do have a few events for my life in my genealogy program, mainly addresses, schools and diplomas.  Outside of this, I have no information that will help my (future) descents.


Plan of attack:  I need to do some (it will someday be) Spring Cleaning!  I will go through my folders and boxes and pull out important documents and give myself a space in my genealogy binders.  I will also write up a short narrative of my life thus far.  Additionally, I need to start adding information about my memories to this blog, as that will make it more useful.


Although I would like to say that I plan to do this soon, the odds are that it will not be until I get back from Germany in July, as I have my plate pretty full for the next month before I leave.

52 Weeks to Better Genealogy - Week #2


Amy Coffin at the We Tree blog is challenging bloggers to become better genealogists, with a new prompt each week through her 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy:



Go to your local public library branch againExamine the local history, archives and/or special collections section. Ask a librarian if you don’t know if your library has special collections or where they are located. Be sure to check the reference section, too, as many of the newer and more valuable books are held in that area. If you have a genealogy blog, write about what you find in your library’s local history and special collections.


Slightly late, but better than never;-)


At the Onondaga County Public Library Central Branch, the Local History/Genealogy room is amazing.  It is on the 6th floor and contains a tremendously large amount of books and microfims.  Some of the items I have used in the past or need to check out that are useful to my searching are:





Marriages from Buffalo church records 1825-1900, volume 1 : transcribed from microfilm of English-speaking Protestant church records and compared with marriage license records in Erie County Hall
  




by Zintz, June P. (June Partridge)


Index of marriages from Buffalo newspapers, 1811-1884 : from a file in the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society, supplemented with additional information from Erie County Hall
by Zintz, June P. (June Partridge)


20 years worth of Buffalo City Directories on microfilm


A catalogue of books, pamphlets, engravings, etc., relating largely to Niagara Falls
by Porter, Peter A. (Peter Augustus), 1853-1925.


The cradle of the queen city: a history of Buffalo to the incorporation of the city
by Bingham, Robert W. (Robert Warwick), b. 1880.




Surname Saturday: Casillo/Casell

Each Saturday this year I am posting one of my surnames, going in alphabetical order.  This weeks surname is Casillo, which was changed to Casell after immigration to the US to fit in better on the railroad where my gg grandfather worked.

According to Gens, Casillo is most common in the Campania region of Italy, which is where my family came from.

Looking at Italy in Full Detail, Casillo is most popular in the Napoli province today, although 17.15 people with the surname still live in Roccaromana, Caserta, Italy, where my ancestors came from.

I currently have 2 microfilms on order for Roccaromana, which should be arriving any day now.  I am hopeful these will expand upon this line.


Descendants of Guiseppe Casillo
-------------------------------
1-Guiseppe Casillo d. Bef 1868
 +Unknown
|--2-Pietro Casillo b. Abt 1835
    +Angela Rosa Palmiero b. Abt 1845
   |--3-Marcantonio Maria Casillo (Marco Antonio Casell) b. 11 Jan 1868, Roccaromana, Caserta,
   |    Campania, Italy, d. 26 Nov 1937, Colden, Erie, New York, USA
       +Caroline Izzo b. 3 May 1876, , , , Italy, d. 2 Oct 1934, Buffalo, Erie,
        New York, USA
      |--4-Amelia Angela Maria Casillo b. 14 Jun 1903, Buffalo, Erie, New York,
      |    USA
      |--4-Alfredo Marco Casillo (Alfred Marco Casell) b. 28 Jun 1906, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA,
      |    d. 25 Jan 1981, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
      |--4-Angela Casillo b. 28 Jun 1906, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
      |--4-Lucia Marian Casillo b. Dec 1910, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA, d.
      |    1993, , , California, USA
      |--4-Clara Casillo b. Abt 1914, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA

Friday, January 22, 2010

Part 4 of The Genealogy Reference Desk Institute

To get to the beginning of this series, go here:-)

The Genealogy Reference Desk Institute had lunch sponsored by ProQuest.  As such, they did a presentation on some of their library services, such as HeritageQuest and Ancestry Library Edition, both of which I use on a regular basis.

They also told us about their new library product: ProQuest Digital Microfilm.  ProQuest will go into libraries and digitize their microfilmed newspaper holdings so that users can have access to it remotely.  It will also be searchable, users can crop and save the articles they want and enhance brightness and contrast.  According to ProQuest, this will "reduce film damage and loss as will as the need to use and maintain microfilm readers/printers."  ProQuest will also help they libraries with getting the rights due to copyright.  It will be interesting to see how many libraries take this on.  I know it would help me out as I do not get to Buffalo nearly enough to go through newspapers there.

The next session was on timelines by Laura Prescott, which I will post tomorrow.

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Upload any Document Type to Google Docs!

Google Docs now allows any type of document to be uploaded! After seeing this announcement I tried to upload my Gedcom and it does indeed work. This is one more place I recommend you back-up your data each month!

Part 3 of The Genealogy Reference Desk Institute

For Part 1 and Part 2 of the series:-)

The third session was titled "My Family is Boring, May I Borrow Yours?: Integrating Historical Research into Historical Inquiry" by Christine Baron.  Christine discussed her work in searching for a way to make the famous Old North Church of Boston into a cite for learning by visitors.

This was one of the most fascinating and useful parts of the day, as Christine and her staff are not genealogists, do not want to be genealogists, but see the value in genealogical interpretations.  Their goal was to "put the people back in the pews," and genealogists at the NEHGS helped them get beyond names and dates, connecting families while using primary and secondary sources.

Although many people have preconceptions about historians versus genealogists, Gex Xers (and Y as well) just want expertise.  These are the people genealogists can reach to expand their users.  What kind of projct would benefit from a genealogist?  Questions about social inter-relationships within a communitty, research involving individuals with common names and technocratic teams without deep idealogical divides.

With the help of genealogists, Christine came up with OldNorth.com and the online program Tories, Timid or True Blue?  This shows students why history is fun, namely the spirit of inquiry and intellectual risk - which is also why genealogy is fun!  Students get to look at primary documents to solve mysteries and learn important things such as "you can't trust everything you see."  I highly recommend looking at the program and using it as a way to get children interested in history and genealogy.

Programs such as these are the future of digitizing information and documents.  The field of digital humanities is fast growing, as people no longer want to know what is being put online, but what one is going to do with it once it's there.

After this session came a presentation by lunch sponsor by ProQuest, which I will discuss tomorrow!

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Part 2 of The Genealogy Reference Desk Institute

Please see part 1 of this series.

The second session of the Genealogy Reference Desk Institute was "An Overview of American Colonial Records" by David Dearborn, staff genealogist at the NEHGS and Fellow, American Society of Genealogists.

David began the presentation by telling us the cardinal rule, "Colonial records were not created for the benefit of 21st century genealogists."  A rule that needs to be remembered for all records, in my opinion, not just those of the colonial time period.

What I learned most about these records is that it is important to learn about the area one is researching, as every area is different and borders changed drastically over time.  Towns were invented in the colonies.  Prior to this, there were ecclesiastical parishes, manors, et cetera, in England, but not a governmental area without a religious basis.

The earlier back your ancestry is in the colonies, the easier it is to find information for a few reasons.  First, there were few people here, so it is relatively easy to follow them.  Second, land records were very well kept and most people owned land.

My ancestors did not immigrate until long after the colonial period, but it was interesting to hear about research strategies.  David also handed out a reading list with many books and articles I will be seeking out.

I will be discussing the third session tomorrow and it was a fantastic one!

How to Make the Most of Your First ALA Midwinter

I attended my first ALA official conference other the weekend in Boston.  I had an amazing time, attending meetings, manning the SU booth, looking at exhibits and hanging out with my fellow students.  Overall, the conference was a stunning success for me and I have a few tips on what one should do for their first conference.

First, try to attend a workshop on Friday if you are interested in any of the topics.  They are of very low cost to the students and you are able to meet librarians in the field you are interested in.  Additionally, you get training that is not offered in school.  I attended the Genealogy Reference Desk Institute and my discussion of it is on my other blog, A Tale of Two Ancestors.

Second, make sure you plan what you want to attend in the way of meetings and exhibits.  The Event Planner is located on the conference page and, while slightly difficult to use at first, allows you to print out your schedule, which is much easier than trying to figure it out when you arrive with the huge book you receive.

Third, try to join a committee.  It is important to remember committee appointments are for 2 years and you are expected to attend all ALA conferences in that time.  I joined the membership committee of the International Relations Round Table.  This allows me to meet librarians in one of the fields I am interested in, help to build my resume and learn more about the inner workings of ALA.

Forth, work at the SU booth if possible and spend time with your fellow students.  The SU booth gives you opportunities to meet SU alumni and network.  Hanging out with your fellow students allows you to learn more about the people who you take classes with and will be your network in the future.

Fifth, walk around to all the exhibits.  There are free books and swag, author signings and all sorts of things you have not yet thought about in your classes, such as insurance and ways to furnish your library.

Sixth, read Cognotes every day.  It is the newsletter of ALA conferences and is published daily.  It tells about events, author signings and any changes in the schedule.

Last, but not least, remember that Midwinter is business meetings, not workshops.  It is not as "exciting" as Annual is, but if you are interested in how ALA committees run and to network, it is a fantastic event!

Tuesday, January 19, 2010

The Genealogy Reference Desk Institute

On Friday, 15 January, I attended the American Library Association's "The Genealogy Reference Desk: Where Everyone Knows Your Name" at the New England Historic Genealogical Society. The NEHGS is located in the historic Back Bay area of Boston in a gorgeous old bank.

The first session was "Sustainability in Genealogical Collections" by D. Brenton Simons, president of the NEHGS. He began by discussing the the Society, which was formed in 1845. They currently have a reference librarian whose entire purpose is to be online to "spread the intellectual capital." I had never realized how much information they have on areas outside of New England, which is shown in their online catalog and portals such as their new AficanAmericanAncestors.org (coming February 3rd). They are even changing their journal name to "American Ancestors" and we were the first outside of staff to get a sneak preview at the cover.

He went on to discuss the importance of a service culture in libraries, quick tips for libraries during economic downturns and strategic planning information. My favorite tip he gave was that your goal should always be "aim to thrive, not just survive." This is what has helped them to thrive during the poor economy when so many others have not.

I will continue my report on the Institute tomorrow, when I will discuss "An Overview of American Colonial Records" by David Dearborn.

Class has Started

The winter break is over and it is time for me to start semester number 2.  I am only taking a one-credit course currently, titled Sustainable Libraries.  The professor, Steven Carr, is one of the first LEED accredited librarians, which should make for a very educational class.  This goes until 22 February.  After that, I am signed up for a second class, Services for Older Adults, which is also a one-credit, one month course.

On 27 February, I leave for Hamburg, Germany, where I will be studying at HAW Hamburg in their information science module from 1 March - 16 July.  I am tremendously excited about this opportunity, as the classes are very technology based and have practical, hands-on assignments.  I will also be studying basic German, which I hope to become conversational in by the time I leave.  In addition to taking classes, I have been using Mango which I love!

Monday, January 18, 2010

Week in Review: 11 Jan 2010 – 17 Jan 2010

After being sick for the first half of the week and in Boston for the second, I did not accomplish any research, blogging or transcribing.  Luckily, the conference I attended in Boston (ALA midwinter) had an optional Genealogical Reference Workshop at the NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY!!!  Starting tomorrow I will do a series of posts on what I learned there and the amazing speakers I saw, which included Laura Prescott, APA President and Drew Smith from The Genealogy Guys Podcast

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Week in Review: 4 Jan 2010 – 10 Jan 2010

Research:
  • Found death dates for Katherine and Charles Gorndt
    • Need marriage date
  • Found marriage date for Amelia Casillo
  • Got census and civil war documents for Charles Gorndt
 Ordered from the FHC:
  • Roccaromano
    • Nati, pubblicazioni, matrimoni, morti, cittadinanze 1887-1910: 1801992 Item 1
    • Morti 1830-1865: 1178754 Items 1-18
    • Nati 1834-1865: 1216619
    • Matrimoni giugno 1834-1865: 1173692 Items 1-13
  • Knockholt, England
    • Baptisms, marriages, burials, 1548-1731. Baptisms, 1727-1812; marriages, 1727-1752; burials, 1727-1783. Marriages and banns, 1754-1798.: 2228390 Items 11 – 13
    • Marriages, 1798-1812; marriage banns, 1798-1813, 1848. Baptisms, 1813-1869. Marriages, 1813-1837. Burials, 1813-1892. Banns, 1824-1945.: 2228391
Blog:
  • Wrote a post for the first Carnival of Genealogy of the year
  • Wrote a post for week 1 of Amy Coffin’s new series
  • Won the data backup weekend prize from Geneabloggers!
 Volunteer:
  • Began transcribing East Aurora in 1865 NY Census for WNYGS
 Organization:
  • Transcribed all documents in my maternal line binders into RootsMagic
    • Now time to hit the big box of documents…

Research Log: 4 Jan 2010 - 10 Jan 2010


Week in Review:
4 Jan 2010 – 10 Jan 2010

Research:
  • Found death dates for Katherine and Charles Gorndt
    • Need marriage date
  • Found marriage date for Amelia Casillo
  • Got census and civil war documents for Charles Gorndt

Ordered from the FHC:
  • Roccaromano
    • Nati, pubblicazioni, matrimoni, morti, cittadinanze 1887-1910: 1801992 Item 1
    • Morti 1830-1865: 1178754 Items 1-18
    • Nati 1834-1865: 1216619
    • Matrimoni giugno 1834-1865: 1173692 Items 1-13
  • Knockholt, England
    • Baptisms, marriages, burials, 1548-1731. Baptisms, 1727-1812; marriages, 1727-1752; burials, 1727-1783. Marriages and banns, 1754-1798.: 2228390 Items 11 – 13
    • Marriages, 1798-1812; marriage banns, 1798-1813, 1848. Baptisms, 1813-1869. Marriages, 1813-1837. Burials, 1813-1892. Banns, 1824-1945.: 2228391
Blog:
  • Wrote a post for the first Carnival of Genealogy of the year
  • Wrote a post for week 1 of Amy Coffin’s new series
  • Won the data backup weekend prize from Geneabloggers!

Volunteer:
  • Began transcribing East Aurora in 1865 NY Census for WNYGS

Organization:
  • Transcribed all documents in my maternal line binders into RootsMagic
    • Now time to hit the big box of documents…

    Happy 101 Award:-)



    Thank you to Greta and Harriet for giving me a Happy 101 Award!  In order to receive it, I first have to give a list of 10 things that make me happy:
    1. My fiancé Aaron, who is my best friend and always there for me.
    2. My family and friends.
    3. The opportunity to go to back to school to get my Master's degree and all the amazing people I am meeting through it.
    4. Traveling.  Whether to a new town or a new country, I love it!
    5. Books.  I love reading and all things book-related.
    6. Making a new genealogy find!
    7. All the cousins I have found doing genealogy.  Two new ones this week alone!
    8. My apartment.  It's nice to have something of your own to go to at the end of a long day.
    9. Singing.  Whether at karaoke, on stage or in my car with the radio:-)
    10. Thinking about my upcoming trip to Germany.  I can't wait!!!

    Now I get to give the award to 10 other bloggers who I enjoy:
    1.  Terri at Little Pieces of Me
    2.  Barbara at One "Fein" Family
    3.  Jennifer at Jennifer's Genealogy Blog
    4.  Amy at We Tree
    5.  Amy at They That Go Down to the Sea
    6.  Barbara at Life From the Roots
    7.  J.M. at Tracing my Roots
    8.  Tina at Gen Wish List
    9.  Jessica at Jessica's Genejournal
    10.  Karen at Karen the Librarian

    SNGF - My Superpower


    Dean Richardson posted What’s Your Genealogical Superpower? on his Genlighten Blog - Genealogy Documented blog last week, along with a nifty picture of a young lady with a big S on her shirt flying (is that Dean's wife?). I thought Dean's question was a great one for SNGF - so your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to...

    1) Answer the question: Do you have a genealogical “superpower”? (i.e., a unique research ability or technique that helps you track down records or assemble conclusions that others can’t?) If so, what is it?


    My superpower is luck.  I have always been a lucky person, which to me means working hard, paying attention to what occurs and taking the opportunities presented to me.  I hear about a new book at the library or an interesting website and I make sure I go check it out, which usually leads me to finding something useful.  Sometimes luck runs out, though, in which case I use my handy jedi-whip pictured above to get what I want;-)

    Make yourself a superhero at The Hero Factory

    Google Personalized Results

    Google has become tremendously important to genealogists.  Some, such as myself, use their blogging platform to share their research.  Others use Google alerts to stay on top of what others are posting about their surnames.  Many more use the search function to try to find ancestors, research help and a multitude of other items.

    Over the past month, you may have noticed a difference in your searches.  If once a week you search for your surname, the same sights now seem to be at the top of the list and genealogy sites seem to be a majority of the hits you receive.  It almost seems as if the Google search bar now knows who you are and creates personalized results.

    Indeed, this is now the case.  In December, in an uncharacteristicly quiet move, Google launched a new personalized search result tool.  When signed into Google, they now keep the information you searched for 180 days.  If they notice you view the links for RootsWeb ofter, other RootsWeb links will then get more weight in the search logarithm.  What does this mean for genealogists?  It can be both a help and a hindrance.  By "knowing" that you often search for genealogy related items, it will push those items to the top of your list.  I have found the problem that it keeps putting the same sites to the top of my search list, making it more difficult to find new sites that may have information for me.

    This is the wave of the future for the internet.  If you do not like it, however, there is an option to opt-out of this personalized searching.  Follow the instructions posted here.

    Saturday, January 9, 2010

    2010, UNESCO International Year for the Rapprochement of Cultures


    Fom the IFLA website:


    Paris, France
    5 January 2010

    copyright : UNESCOUNESCO

    The goal of the International Year consists in making the rapprochement of cultures the hallmark of all policy-making at local, national, regional and international levels, involving the greatest number of relevant stakeholders.
    Entrusted with the mandate to contribute to build "the defences of peace in the minds of men" thanks to international cooperation in the fields of its competence, namely through education, sciences, culture and communication, UNESCO is designated to play a leading role for the celebration of the Year within the United Nations system.

    In fact, over the years and indeed in the past decade, the Organization has gained special experience and has won recognition through its efforts to demonstrate the beneficial effects of cultural diversity highlighting the importance of borrowings, transfers and exchanges between cultures.

    Buffalo, NY Local History File being Digitized

    The Buffalo & Erie County Public Library is digitizing its Local history File and putting it on Flickr.  According to the website, "The Local History File is the Library’s most comprehensive resource for Buffalo research. It is an index to select Buffalo newspaper articles. References to books, vertical file materials, scrapbooks, and magazines are also included. 

    The Local History File covers Buffalo and Erie County people, places, things, and history. It was started in 1936 as a WPA project and now includes about 300,000 entries on over 100,000 index cards. Most citations date from 1930-1982, but some go back as far as the 1890s and as recent as this year.

    Repository: 
    Grosvenor Room, Central Library, Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, 1 Lafayette Square, Buffalo, NY 14203-1887. www.buffalolib.org"

    They currently have 60 state hospital cards, which are fully searchable.  As they add files, this will be a boon to genealogists with family from Western New York who are unable to travel to the library.

    Surname Saturday: Bond

    In the new year, I am finally going to start doing the Surname Saturday theme.  My plan is to go alphabetically through each of my surnames in order to get them all on the internet and, hopefully, meet some more cousins:-)


    The second surname for the year is Bond.  The Bond's were located in Knockholt, Sevenoaks, Kent, England.  After marriage, Emma Bond Whitehead moved to Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England.  I currently have 3 microfilms on order at the Family History Center for Knockholt.  These will hopefully arrive in the next week and I will write a follow-up post once that occurs.



    Descendants of Richard Bond
    ---------------------------
    1-Richard Bond d. Bef 1841
     +Mary b. Abt 1798, Knockholt, Sevenoaks, Kent, England, d. 3 Nov 1862,
      Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |--2-Emma Bond b. Cir 1812, Knockholt, Sevenoaks, Kent, England, d. 24 Feb
    |    1877, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |   +Charles Whitehead b. Cir 1811, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England, d. 13
    |    Mar 1887, Sundridge, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |--3-Hannah Whitehead b. Abt 1836, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |--3-William Whitehead b. Abt 1838, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |   +Caroline Feust b. Abt 1840, Westerham, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |  |--4-Edward Whitehead b. Abt 1863, Knockholt, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |  |--4-Rose Whitehead b. Abt 1866, Chelsfield, , Kent, England
    |  |  |--4-Emma Whitehead b. Abt 1869, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |  |--4-Sarah Whitehead b. Abt 1874, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |  |--4-Minnie Whitehead b. Abt 1880, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |--3-Charles Whitehead b. 10 Oct 1840, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England,
    |  |    d. 12 Oct 1902, Hamilton, Wentworth, Ontario, Canada
    |  |   +Mary Ann Hayman b. 11 Mar 1845, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England, d.
    |  |    16 May 1877, Barton, Wentworth, Ontario, Canada
    |  |  |--4-Benjamin Thomas Whitehead b. 31 Oct 1866, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent,
    |  |  |    England, d. 11 Apr 1906, Hamilton, Wentworth, Ontario, Canada
    |  |  |--4-Joseph Whitehead b. 2 Nov 1869, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England,
    |  |  |    d. 4 Apr 1936, Hamilton, Wentworth, Ontario, Canada
    |  |  |--4-Charles William Whitehead b. 12 Jun 1872, Burlington, , Ontario,
    |  |  |    Canada, d. 27 Dec 1927, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA
    |  |  |--4-Rosanna Whitehead b. 5 Jan 1875, Barton, Wentworth, Ontario, Canada,
    |  |  |    d. 2 Dec 1924, Hamilton, Wentworth, Ontario, Canada
    |  |--3-Jane Whitehead b. Abt 1847, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |--3-George Whitehead b. Abt 1849, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |--3-Emma Whitehead bap. 29 Jun 1851, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England,
    |  |    bur. 26 Oct 1852, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |--3-Edward Whitehead b. Abt 1853, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |      +Barbara b. Abt 1859, Seal, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |     |--4-Edward George Whitehead b. Abt 1880, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent,
    |     |    England
    |     |--4-Edith Hilda Whitehead bap. 31 May 1891, Halstead, Sevenoaks, Kent,
    |     |    England
    |     |--4-William Gordon Whitehead bap. 28 Dec 1891, Halstead, Sevenoaks,
    |     |    Kent, England
    |--2-Hannah Bond b. Abt 1820, Knockholt, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |   +William Morgan b. Abt 1820, Knockholt, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |  |--3-William Morgan b. Abt 1846, Knockholt, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |--2-Richard Bond b. Abt 1820, Knockholt, Sevenoaks, Kent, England
    |   +Sarah b. Abt 1820
    |  |--3-Hannah Bond b. Abt 1839
    |  |--3-Bond b. Abt 1841
    |--2-James Bond b. Abt 1825
    |--2-George Bond b. Abt 1826
    |--2-John Bond b. Abt 1828
    |--2-Samuel Bond b. Abt 1831





    Wednesday, January 6, 2010

    (Nearly) Worldess Wednesday - Sulmona, Italy - Casillo


    Posted by Picasa
    The young woman in my great-great aunt Amelia Casillo Berni.  The child is her son Frank.  Who are the other two people?  We have no idea.  I also have not yet researched the area of Sulmona yet.  I have ordered the FHC film for my ggg grandparents marriage (hopefully) and it may give Carolina Izzo's hometown, which may help clear up this photo.  If anyone knows Italian, can you translate what this card says?  The Google translation was jibberish:-(

    Tuesday, January 5, 2010

    Tombstone(less) Tuesday - Marie Strassheim Tross and Louise J. Tross


    My great-great-great grandmother Marie Strassheim Tross (1841 - 1921) in Buffalo Cemetery, Buffalo, Erie, NY.  The tombstone belongs to to her granddaughter Louise J. Tross (1913 - 1937)

    Monday, January 4, 2010

    One more reason GeneaBloggers rocks

    My recent post, Data Backup Weekend, was also an entry into the GeneaBloggers Data Backup Weekend Contest and, amazingly, I WON!  My prize is the Handy Backup Standard 6.4 by Novosoft LLC.  I am so excited to have this software, which will back up my computer on a monthly, weekly or daily (for those true OCD types) basis without my having to worry about it.  I am so excited to start playing with this new software and will let you all know what I think about it for the next Data Backup day:-)


    Thank you GeneaBloggers and Novosoft LLC!

    Volunteerism in the Genealogical World

    Up until I went back to school in August, my favorite way to volunteer in the genealogy world was through Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness.  I began by going to cemeteries to take photographs of tombstones (or grave sites if there wasn't a headstone) for people.  This became a "date" day, once or twice a month, for my fiancé and I, where we would drive around Onondaga county and see who could find the most tombstones, walking up and down the rows in the cemeteries (see why he's a keeper?!?).  Eventually it progressed to my doing searches at the library, mostly for city directories and obituaries, and at the courthouse, where I never had much luck unfortunately.

    I also volunteer for FamilySearch Indexing, mainly for the 1892 New York census.  I did not do nearly as many names as I had hoped, but I like knowing I was part of the group that got this project finished.  Just today I received an email from the president of the Western New York genealogy society, to which I belong, asking if I would be willing to to help transcribe or proof read the 1865 New York census, which they are putting online.  I jumped at the chance to be part of this project, as state census' are a tremendously helpful, but often overlooked, resource.  I am also excited to become an active member of the society, despite living too far away to make meetings.

    I have received three main things from volunteering in the genealogy world.  First, I learnt about new resources and practiced finding them.  Prior to volunteering with RAOGK, I had no idea how useful city directories were.  This has helped in my research tremendously.  Second, I have gotten a lot of practice in deciphering handwriting.  Although I am still much better at seeing a name I am looking for in a document compared to transcribing unfamiliar handwriting, I will learn this skill and I will learn it much faster than if I just practiced with my ancestors handwriting.  Third, I have discovered a possible career.  I realized how much I love genealogy, not just researching my family, but other families as well.  This has lead me to get my masters degree in library science with the goal of working in a genealogy and local history library.  Eventually, I would like to become a certified genealogist and help people with their search that way, but it will be a few years before I get to that level.

    I highly recommend volunteering in whatever capacity you are able.  It helps improve your research skills, introduces you to new people and record groups and builds up good genealogy karma, which will hopefully lead to more genealogy happy dances!

    52 Weeks to Better Genealogy - Week #1

    Amy Coffin at the We Tree blog is challenging bloggers to become better genealogists, with a new prompt each week through her 52 Weeks to Better Genealogy:


    Week 1 is: Go to your local public library branch. Make a note of the genealogy books in the collection that may help you gain research knowledge. Don’t forget to check the shelves in both the non-fiction section and the reference section. If you do not already have a library card, take the time to get one. If you have a genealogy blog, write about what you find in your library’s genealogy collection.



    As my library is part of a large county library system, I went to their website and started searching for genealogy books that I have not yet read.  I have requested the following, which will be delivered over the next few weeks as they become available:


    Finding your Italian Ancestors: A Beginners Guide by Suzanne Russo Adams: I have a long list of microfilms to order from the FHC for my Italian ancestors.  This book will hopefully help me see where to take the search beyond the FHC.


    In Search of your German Roots: A Complete Guide to Tracing your Ancestors in the Germanic Areas of Europe by Angus Baxter: One of my goals this year is to trace my German ancestry further, this book is highly rated to help me do just that.


    Tracing your Pauper Ancestors: A Guide for Family Historians by Robert Burlison: This guide is for tracing your English ancestors who were affected by poverty.  As I have found some living in workhouses, this book will be very useful for finding additional records on them.


    Genealogy by George G. Morgan: It's by George C. Morgan, how can I not read this?


    Who Do You Think You Are?: The Essential Guide to Tracing your Family History by Megan Smolenyak: See above title, just replace author name:-)


    Finding Anyone, Anywhere, Anywhen by Noel Montgomery Elliot: This should be useful in my goal to find living relatives this year.


    Social Networking for Genealogists by Drew Smith: I have wanted to read this since it came out and my library has just recently bought it.


    Google your Family Tree: Unlocking the Hidden Power of Google by Daniel M. Lynch: I need some assistance in setting up Google alerts for my ancestors.


    The Oxford Guide to Library Research by Thomas Mann: There is a chapter in here on genealogy.  It should also be helpful for my current schooling.

    52 Ancestors: Angela Rosa Palmiero

    Amy Johnson Crow at  No Story Too Small  began the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge in 2014.  I am playing along this year.  I wi...