Saturday, March 3, 2012

Technology for the Genealogist

The Central New York Genealogical Society held a program Saturday on new technology for genealogists. Here are a few more technologies you may be interested in:

eBook Readers. Whether Sony, Nook, Kindle or iPad, you can do more than just download genealogy books, you can use it to assist in your research. These devises all allow the user to upload pdf documents. Most genealogy programs all you to save your charts as a pdf. By uploading this to your eReader, you will have all your research with you in a compact, easy to carry device.
QR Codes. Quick Response codes are small bar codes that are scanned by a smart phone camera, decoded by a reader on your phone and then take you to a URL or show you text. In genealogy these can be useful in a multitude of ways, such as allowing other genealogists to see your blog or surname interests from your business card. Additionally, Timeless Footsteps has just created a QR code you affix to a tombstone, allowing others to learn more about the person buried there. This business card sized plaque will allow others to see photographs, life stories and find connections to other researchers. It even connects the person to information on FamilySearch and Ancestry. FOr further QR code information, view Thomas MacEntee's posts.
GPS. Not the genealogical proof standard, but global positioning system. GPS mapping technology is currently being used to help genealogists find cemeteries and grave sites. By having an exact coordinate, it is much easier to find the location of a grave site than by wandering up and down rows of tomb stones, particularly if your ancestor does not have a stone. A helpful guide to GPS mapping, written by Michael T. Booth, is located here.
RootsTech. If you are interested in not only learning more about the combining of genealogy and technology, but also helping to drive it, a new conference is being held in February in Salt Lake City. RootsTech is going to look at current and emerging technologies and how they can help genealogists.
What technologies do you use for your research? Which would you like to use?

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