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Showing posts from 2015

2015 in Review

Well, I haven't updated here in quite a while, but I've posted these for the last few years and want to keep it up.

1. What did you do in 2015 that you’d never done before? Ordered books with other people's money.  In my new job, I'm in charge of collection development for adults; it's a dream come true.

2. Did you keep your New Year’s resolutions, and will you make more for next year? I'm not a fan of resolutions; I much prefer a word of the year.  My word for 2015 was "passion"n and I wanted to focus on things I love and leave the rest behind, both in action and in stuff in our apartment.  I did pretty well with this, though it's a work in progress.  In fact, my 2016 word, "Connect," is a continuation of the passion idea.  I want to connect more with my family and friends and with myself, particularly in terms of my health and my hobbies.

3. Did anyone close to you give birth? Calvin, Ava, Charlotte, Harrison, Nora, and Anna (who just arr…

GRAIP 2015: Day 4

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For my first post on this year's Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP), go here.


Another full day at GRIP began with "The Records of Institutions and Local Governments" by Karen Mauer Jones.  This discussed the multitude of record sources available outside of the state, which included many things I never thought to look at, such as Supervisors' Minutes.

Jane E. Wilcox then presented "Up the North River: An Overview of Pre-1800 Hudson Valley Ethnic Groups and Religions."  This was a general history of the area which was tremendously diverse for the time period.

Third, we heard "Turnpikes, Canals, & Railroad" by Karen.  This was one of the classes I most looking forward to and it didn't disappoint.  I learned about the records for the Erie Canal at the state archives that I need to go through looking for my ancestors who worked on the Canal in Buffalo.  I also have other places to look for railroad records, as I had many ances…

GRIP 2015: Day 3

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For my first post on this year's Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP), go here.



Apologies for the late  posting, I couldn't put down The Girl on the Train.

Day 3 began with "New York Land: Patroonships, Manors, Patents, Rent Wars, and Land Companies" by Karen Mauer Jones.  The amount of information given was a bit overwhelming, as records change through time and are different depending on the area of the state and if it is an urban or rural setting.  Records in Western New York are often rich, since they went through the Holland Land Company.

Next up was Jane E. Wilcox's "Looking for your NY Tenant Farmer: Little-Used Resources."  This looked more in-depth at manors and patents that were also discussed in the first presentation of the day.  These records are invaluable for people with pre-colonial ancestors in the Hudson Valley area.

After lunch Thomas W. Jones presented "Workarounds to New York Record Shortages: Greenfield Example…

GRIP 2015: Day 2

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For my first post on this year's Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP), go here.

Another full day of GRIP classes commenced today at 8:30 am, though really, some of my favorite parts of GRIP occur before this and around classes, when you can sit and talk to other attendees.  Having attended 2 other GRIP institutes and a few conferences, I now have people whom I recognize and know in addition to all of the wonderful people I get to meet.  If you are worried that you do not know anyone and that is why you do not want to attend, I can guarantee it isn't a problem.  Sit at any table in the cafeteria and you'll meet interesting people who are actually interested and understand your genealogical addiction.

Our first class today was the second part of Judy Russell's "Justice in the Empire State: Legal Records in NY State."  Having had an overview of the laws and courts yesterday, today we were shown actual records and how you can use them to create a …

GRIP 2015: Researching New York State

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My third time at the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP) began yesterday afternoon after arriving at La Roche College in Pittsburgh.  I attended the first year, 2012, and last year, 2014, and it is something I look forward to all year.

Every year we get a little present and this years was a USB drive attached to a name tag, which will be very useful to bring on research trips to keep that plus my ID and credit card together.

This year I am in the "Researching New York State" track coordinated by Karen Mauer Jones.  As soon as I saw that being offered, I knew I had to take it.  All of my and my husband's lines end in New York State and while I can tell anyone how to research in Buffalo, but once I get into rural Central and Northern NY, records are much harder to come by.

Our days are broken into 4 classes plus an optional nightly lecture that is open to the public.  My classes today were Researching New York: Introduction and Historical Overview with Ka…

#LoveWins

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"No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were. As some of the petitioners in these cases demonstrate, marriage embodies a love that may endure even past death. It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it, respect it so deeply that they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization’s oldest institutions. They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right. The judgment of the Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit is reversed. It is so ordered."

And for the genealogy blog related part...  Genealogy companies, time to let us put same-sex couples into our family tree programs correctly.  Legacy has a worka…

Wordless Wednesday: The Williams Family

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Ralph, Carrie (Gress) and Ethelyn Williams.  Buffalo, Erie, NY.  Around the turn of the last century (1900).  According to Legacy, Carrie is my 2nd great grand aunt and Ethelyn is my first cousin, three times removed.

 Formerly in possession of my great aunt Lois.

Tombstone Tuesday: Barbara Fleeman Fink

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Located in Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, Erie, NY.  Barbara is my 3rd great grandmother.

Wordless Wednesday: Whitehead Girls

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Lois, Janice, and Barbara Whitehead, 1930, most likely in Buffalo, NY.  My maternal grandmother's older sisters.  Photo in possession of my great aunt Barbara.

The 30-Day Learning Challenge

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In addition to #blogjune, I'm also taking part in zen habits 30-Day Learning Challenge which is taking one topic and studying it for at least 10 minutes per day, every day of the month.  The topic I have decided to look at in German Genealogy.  I will be reading and studying the following:

My GRIP syllabus from the German genealogy course I took in 2012.The German genealogy FamilySearch Wiki.4 webinars from Legacy Family Tree Webinars. Lots of books, includingThe German Research Companion 3rd Ed. Revised and Updated [2010]The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide: How to Trace Your Germanic Ancestry in EuropeIn Search of Your German Roots. A Complete Guide to Tracing Your Ancestors in the Germanic Areas of Europe. Fifth EditionA Genealogist's Guide to Discovering Your Germanic Ancestors (Genealogist's Guides to Discovering Your Ancestor...) My goal in studying this information is to make progress on my Gress, Fink, Strassheim, and Passel ancestry.

#blogjune & MM1

It's #blogjune again!  I tried this last year and kind of failed, so I'm trying again.  You can sign up here.

List 5 things you’re looking forward to about #blogjune [Monday Meme 1]
1. A reminder to actually post on here.
2. #blogjune is full of Australian library bloggers, who write interesting things that I don't know much about.
3. Having a record of all of the interesting things going on in my genealogy/library/travel/etc. life.
4. Actually working on my genealogy more so that I have something to blog about. 5. Developing the blogging habit again.

Two

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Dear Julian-Bug,

Happy second birthday!  I find it both amazing how fast time has gone and how much we have been able to cram into such a short time.

In one year you have gone from cruising to running and climbing and jumping, from mimicking words to saying sentences, stories and songs.  Your vocabulary is huge and varied and we can understand about 90% of what you say.  You can count to 10, sing your ABCs (mostly), know animal sounds (especially if it can roar like a lion or dragon), and just this week figured out a few colors.  You use "please" and "thank you" and say "bless you."  You are a fantastic singer, which I imagine you won't believe when I tell you when you're older, but you actually sing, not yell, and are in tune and often on pitch.  Your favorite song to sing is "Tomorrow" from Annie and we had a few weeks of "Let it Go."  "Farmer in the Dell," "Wheels on the Bus," "Twinkle, Twinkle Lit…

DNA Results: Ethnicity Estimate (Me)

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I finally jumped into the DNA testing pool.  Ancestry had a great sale at the beginning of March and I bought a test for myself and for my husband.  My results arrived Wednesday and I have been playing around on the site trying to build my tree and my husband's as my results came in much faster than I had anticipated.


The first thing I looked at was my ethnicity estimate.  Unsurprisingly, my ethnicity is "very white."  33% Europe East would be Germany, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg.  18% Great Britain is mainly England, 17% Italy/Greece is just Italy for me. The 15% Scandinavia surprised me until I read that people with German ancestors can show up as Scandinavian ancestry in this test.  11% Europe East is Poland and the trace regions are 3% Ireland and 2% Iberian Peninsula.  The less than 1% West Asia is in the Middle East and I'm guessing has to do with my Italian ancestors going further back.

The ethnicity estimate is what I expected and most of it can be figur…

Webinar: Ten Genealogical Lessons I Learned the Hard Way

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Warren Bittner is among the best, if not the best, genealogical speaker I've ever heard.  I was very excited to see that he was giving a webinar entitled "Ten Genealogical Lessons I Learned the Hard Way" through Legacy Family Tree Webinars today.

This was a fantastic webinar and one that I highly recommend people check out.  A lot of these are things you hear when you learn how to do genealogical research and know you should do, but that you don't always do. 

My favorites are to build the citation up front, read Genealogy Standards: Fiftieth Anniversary Edition quarterly, summarize and plan on the go, and write proof summaries.    Because I didn't do that with my research years ago, I have been going through all of my research over the past couple years and making sure it is cited properly and the conclusions I reached made sense.  In the future I will be doing this as I go along.

I also really liked his discussion on credentials.  At GRIP last summer, I menti…

Tombstone Tuesday: Ted Acquard

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Photo of my grandfather Theodore Acquard's grave with flowers from my Uncle Brian's funeral.  St. John's Roman Catholic Church, Alden, NY.  Photo courtesy of my Aunt Barb.

Thirfty Thursday: RootsMOOC

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What is more thrifty than free?  Canvas Network is currently hosting RootsMOOC: Intro to Genealogy and Family History Research, a free massive open, online course for beginning genealogists.  I'm a big fan of refresher courses, so I signed up. It is being taught by librarians at the State Library of North Carolina.

It is currently in the introduction week, but there is already a great surname list and a lot of discussion.  Hope to see you there!

Sunday's Obituary: Brian Acquard

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ACQUARD - Brian M. Of Alden, NY, March 4, 2015, beloved father of Scott (Laura), Brianne and Brian Acquard; dear stepfather of Jennifer (Robert) Mitscher, Amanda and Brittany Jutze; step-grandfather of Zachary and Abigail; son of Agnes (Nuwer) and the late Theodore Acquard; brother of Mark (Kim) Acquard, Barbara (Dan) Kay, Laura (Frank) Orlowski and Lisa (Brian) Anger. No prior visitation. A Memorial Service will be held at the First Baptist Church of Attica, 3 Prospect St., Attica, NY, Wednesday at 11 AM. Flowers gratefully declined. Arrangements by the CHARLES MEYER FUNERAL HOME.

RIP Uncle Brian
9 Feb 1965 - 4 Mar 2015

Published in the Buffalo News on Mar. 8, 2015
http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/buffalonews/obituary.aspx?n=Brian-M-ACQUARD&pid=174344292

SNGF: The Date Your Grandmother Was Born

For this week's mission (should you decide to accept it), I challenge you to:

What day of the week was your Grandmother born (either one)? Tell us how you found out.What event was a headline in the newspapers on that date?  Tell us how you found out.What has happened in recorded history on your Grandmother's birth date? Tell us how you found out, and list five events. What famous people have been born on your Grandmother's birth date? Tell us how you found out, and list five of them. Put your responses in your own blog post, in a comment on this blog post, or in a status or comment on Facebook. 1. I'm going to skip back a generation, to one of my great-grandmothers, Lillian Eichhorn, who was born 22 December 1908 in Buffalo, Erie, New York, to William Eichhorn and Augusta Tross.  According to the calendar in Legacy Family Tree, was a Tuesday.
2. "Reforms in the Navy Begun" from The Sun (New York City).  I couldn't find an online scan from a paper for Buffa…

SNGF: How Did You Meet Your Significant Other?

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This week's Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: It's story time - tell us how you met your spouse or significant other.  If you don't have one, tell us about your parents met each other.

In 2007 I moved to Syracuse to take a job with Starbucks.  A week or so after I started I had a sit-down with the district manager to discuss how my training was going and after we spoke he turned to some guy sitting behind him who was drinking an espresso and reading the newspaper and asked how he thought I was doing.  Luckily for me, he thought I was doing well.  I thought this was the oddest thing, but learned later that the guy sitting in the corner was a regular and had been at my DM's former store as well.

Over the next few months, the guy drinking espresso and reading the newspaper and I became friends.  Eventually Aaron and I were hanging out all the time.  And about a year after we first met, with the help of our friend Shannon, we started dating and have been together ever since.  …

SNGF: Best Find of 2014, and Research Challenge for 2015

I'm joining Randy at Genea-Musings this week for some Saturday Night Genealogy Fun:

1)  What was your best research achievement in 2014?  Tell us - show us a document, or tell us a story, or display a photograph.  Brag a bit!  You've earned it!


This is pretty easy considering the small amount of research I did in 2014, though I'm pretty certain I'd have used this anyway.  While at GRIP I found where my Polish ancestors are from and expanded their names by multiple generations, thanks to Geneteka's database.  

My great-great grandparents Franciszek Karpiński and Józefa Szydlik were married in Ostrów Mazowiecka, Mazowieckie, Poland in 1904.  His parents are Jan Karpiński and Rozalia Zamojska; hers are Tomasz Szydlik and Barbara Gacioch.   Prior to this I had their names, the marriage year, and some names of their parents.

3rd great grandparents:
Jan and Rozalia were married in 1879, also in Ostrów Mazowiecka, Mazowieckie, Poland.  His parents are Franciszek Karpiński and …