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Showing posts from 2016

2016 in Review

Another year has come and come.  Another year of not much posting, which I'd like to say will change this year, but we shall see.  My annual review.

1. What did you do in 2016 that you’d never done before? Visited my friend Wendy and her family at one of their deployment locations, which I've meant to do many times before.  I've now clicked off South Dakota, Iowa, and Nebraska from the states I've visited list.

2. Did you keep your New Year’s resolutions, and will you make more for next year? I'm not a fan of resolutions; I much prefer a word of the year.  My word for 2016 was "connect" and I wanted to focus on connecting more with my family and friends and with myself, particularly in terms of my health and my hobbies  I did pretty well with this, visiting friends like Wendy and Tom and going on a birthday trip with Rachel & friends, as well as seeing friends and family pretty frequently locally.  It wasn't perfect, there were some people I didn…

A Little Detective Work

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As you may know, I work in a small public library in Central New York.  One of the books donated for the book sale was an old library book that had been withdrawn at some point and sold.  Little Lore Fauntleroy was written in 1886 by Frances Hodgson Burnett.  It was stamped and marked as book number 7010.  More interesting was that it was signed "Daisy Turner" with the date "Oct- 1886-".
Thanks to some research by one of my amazing pages, we think it was placed into the library in the 1930s.  Because I had some time while sitting at the circulation desk, I thought I would try to find out who Daisy was and why she donated this book to the library.
Thanks to Ancestry.com Library Edition and Newspaper Archive.com (also available through the library), I learned that Daisy Muriel Turner was born 10 Mar 1874 in Chicago and moved to Skaneateles in 1900 with her mother Helen (Wheaton) Turner after her father William died. She died in 1968 and is buried in Lakeview Cemete…

Census Sunday: Eichhorn 1861 & 1871

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I had two great finds on Ancestry this week for census records that I have needed for a while.  My 4th great grandparents, Nicholas and Dorothea Eichhorn and their son, my 3rd great grandfather, Charles Herman, in Chippawa, Ontario, Canada.


Sources:
1861 census of Canada East, Canada West, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, Ontario, Welland, sub-district Chippawa, Chippawa, p. 21, Nicholas Thorn; RG 31; digital images, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 22 Apr 2016); citing Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Census Returns For 1861; Roll: C-1080.

1871 census of Canada, Ontario, district 19, sub-district K, Chippawa, p. 22, dwelling 75, family 75, Nicholas Thorn household; RG 31; digital images, Libraries and Archives Canada, Libraries and Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng : accessed 22 Apr 2016).

SNGF: Share Your Childhood Memories

Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:

 1) Judy Russell asked six questions in her Keynote address at RootsTech 2014 to determine if audience members knew certain family stories about their parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. She demonstrated very well that family stories are lost within three generations if they are not recorded and passed on to later generations.

 2) This week, I want you to answer Judy's six questions, but about YOUR own life story, not your ancestors. Here are the questions:

 a) What was your first illness as a child? I had a lot of ear infections as a kid and got tubes starting around age 2 all the way until middle school.

 b) What was the first funeral you attended? When I was 16 I was asked to sing at a funeral for a baby who had died of SIDS. It was really, really sad.

 c) What was your favorite book as a child? 10 Apples Up On Top by Dr. Seuss.

 d) What was your favorite class in element…

CNYGS April 2016 Conference

I attended my first conference through the Central New York Genealogical Society Saturday.  Featuring Lisa Alzo, the conference focused on how to write your family history.
I loved that a day long conference on writing began with organization in "Packrat or Genealogist? Effective Methods for Organizing Your Family History Research."  It's hard to write your family history when your research looks like this:

Now that we're all organized (hahaha), it's time to plan our writing.  In the presentation “Writing Your Family History Step-by-Step,” Lisa began by saying (loose quote) "You need a writing plan just like a research plan.  If you're just sitting around waiting for inspiration it isn't going to happen."  Brilliant, true, and similar what to what Liz Gilbert said in Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, which I recently read and highly recommend.  Use your charts and timelines as a framework, think about your audience, and start writing.

“Th…

OneNote and Genealogy

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Over the past 6 months I have been getting back into my personal genealogy after a few year relative absence.  Part of this started when I was asked to speak to the Genealogy Interest Group of the Central New York Genealogical Society for February.  I was allowed to pick my own topic and since I have been using OneNote for my genealogy and wanted to figure out how to use it better, I chose that.   It turns out if you're going to present on something, having information for screenshots is a necessity, so I needed to update my database.

And I am so thankful that I did.  I began by looking online and seeing how other genealogists used it.  I already knew that Caroline Pointer had awesome videos on OneNote, so I started there and then started playing around.

Since over the past few years I restarted my genealogy by creating a new database in Legacy and re-entering all of my research to make sure it was properly sourced and that I wasn't missing anything, this became a continuatio…

FINALLY Get Organized Challenge: January 2016

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Part of my 2016 theme of connect is to connect to my ancestors be spending more time on my genealogy.  Over the past couple years I have been mainly re-inputting my information and sources into Legacy, making sure they're organized in binders, and organizing everything better in OneNote.  Dear Myrtle's FINALLY Get Organized! challenge is a great resource for this.   Week 1: January 3-9:  This one was pretty easy.  I don't have a desk, I have all the supplies I need, I have Amazon Prime, and I tend to be the computer help.  I did create a "Genealogy Challenges" page in OneNote, so I'm now all set there.Week 2: January 10-16: This week started off pretty easily, too.  My Legacy files are in Dropbox and they, along with every other file on my computer is backed up through SugarSync.  I've been using Legacy for many years now and love it, so I will keep it.Then came the harder part.  First I created a binder for my maiden name, Acquard.  Then I started going …