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Showing posts from April, 2016

Census Sunday: Eichhorn 1861 & 1871

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I had two great finds on Ancestry this week for census records that I have needed for a while.  My 4th great grandparents, Nicholas and Dorothea Eichhorn and their son, my 3rd great grandfather, Charles Herman, in Chippawa, Ontario, Canada.


Sources:
1861 census of Canada East, Canada West, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, Ontario, Welland, sub-district Chippawa, Chippawa, p. 21, Nicholas Thorn; RG 31; digital images, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 22 Apr 2016); citing Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Census Returns For 1861; Roll: C-1080.

1871 census of Canada, Ontario, district 19, sub-district K, Chippawa, p. 22, dwelling 75, family 75, Nicholas Thorn household; RG 31; digital images, Libraries and Archives Canada, Libraries and Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng : accessed 22 Apr 2016).

SNGF: Share Your Childhood Memories

Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:

 1) Judy Russell asked six questions in her Keynote address at RootsTech 2014 to determine if audience members knew certain family stories about their parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. She demonstrated very well that family stories are lost within three generations if they are not recorded and passed on to later generations.

 2) This week, I want you to answer Judy's six questions, but about YOUR own life story, not your ancestors. Here are the questions:

 a) What was your first illness as a child? I had a lot of ear infections as a kid and got tubes starting around age 2 all the way until middle school.

 b) What was the first funeral you attended? When I was 16 I was asked to sing at a funeral for a baby who had died of SIDS. It was really, really sad.

 c) What was your favorite book as a child? 10 Apples Up On Top by Dr. Seuss.

 d) What was your favorite class in element…

CNYGS April 2016 Conference

I attended my first conference through the Central New York Genealogical Society Saturday.  Featuring Lisa Alzo, the conference focused on how to write your family history.
I loved that a day long conference on writing began with organization in "Packrat or Genealogist? Effective Methods for Organizing Your Family History Research."  It's hard to write your family history when your research looks like this:

Now that we're all organized (hahaha), it's time to plan our writing.  In the presentation “Writing Your Family History Step-by-Step,” Lisa began by saying (loose quote) "You need a writing plan just like a research plan.  If you're just sitting around waiting for inspiration it isn't going to happen."  Brilliant, true, and similar what to what Liz Gilbert said in Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, which I recently read and highly recommend.  Use your charts and timelines as a framework, think about your audience, and start writing.

“Th…

OneNote and Genealogy

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Over the past 6 months I have been getting back into my personal genealogy after a few year relative absence.  Part of this started when I was asked to speak to the Genealogy Interest Group of the Central New York Genealogical Society for February.  I was allowed to pick my own topic and since I have been using OneNote for my genealogy and wanted to figure out how to use it better, I chose that.   It turns out if you're going to present on something, having information for screenshots is a necessity, so I needed to update my database.

And I am so thankful that I did.  I began by looking online and seeing how other genealogists used it.  I already knew that Caroline Pointer had awesome videos on OneNote, so I started there and then started playing around.

Since over the past few years I restarted my genealogy by creating a new database in Legacy and re-entering all of my research to make sure it was properly sourced and that I wasn't missing anything, this became a continuatio…