3 Rules of the Tiger Manager

I recently read Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua (no relation to Charlie Sheen's tiger blood;-))  and while I did not agree with all of it, and doubt I will one day raise children this way, I did notice a lot of what she said relates to my management style.

As such, here are my three rules for being a Tiger Manager:

  1. People live up to their expectations: Whether good or bad, people tend to do the least that is expected of them.  For a manager, this means setting high expectations that people will reach for and, hopefully, exceed.  If you set low or no expectations, that is all you will find people doing, which is not helpful to them or you.

  2. Training is everything: I have often said I can teach a person how to do anything except to be nice (a subject for another post).  To do this, one needs to be trained and then have the opportunity to use those skills continuously.  Make sure that the trainer is the best person you have for a particular skill.  For example, I used to have an amazing "slider" at Starbucks.  She would make the lobby look amazing each time she was asked too.  She was my go-to trainer for this aspect of the job.

  3. Pay attention and give feedback:  Management is not for the person who wants to just do their job and go home.  You need to pay attention to what each of your employees is doing and give constant feedback, both positive and corrective.  This should never just happen at a review.  Reviews are just an annual writing of what you and the employee have discussed over the year; it should never be a surprise.


Remember, your job as manager is to assist your employees in becoming better versions of themselves, so that they can expand their skills and move up in their chosen career path.  It is not easy work, but it can be tremendously rewarding.

Comments

  1. I was so confused about what to buy, but this makes it understnadlabe.

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